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January 13, 2017

Classical Receptions Film Series

Every film on this list will be shown on Thursdays in RCC 320 at 7 PM.

If you have any additional questions, ask Professor Benjamin Stevens (bstevens@trinity.edu)

1/18: 

Winter's Bone (Granik 2010), a young woman's harrowing odyssey into adulthood--and into her family's charged history--in the hard-bitten Ozark Mountains. 

1/25:  Ex Machina (Garland 2015), a sharply lyrical depiction of the desire for artificial life, with shades of mythic Pygmalion and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

2/1: 

Cold Mountain (Minghella 2003), a gorgeous adaptation of Homeric homecoming to a South wracked by the Civil War and crossed by unsung American traditions.

2/8: 

The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (Jones 2005), a grimly rollicking take on Faulkner's As I Lay Dying--and so on ancient myths of Agamemnon--in the sere landforms of the Mexican-American border. 

2/15: The Virgin Suicides (Coppola 1999), a gauzy vision of classical Greek tragedy as modern American confession, shedding unflinching light on the psychodrama of teenage suburbia. 

2/22: 

Hedwig and the Angry Inch (Mitchell 2001), the seminal rock opera and '80s period piece, exploring a transgender life in the shadow of the Cold War and in the light of Plato's Symposium

3/1: The Two Faces of January (Amini 2014), a sunny, sordid adaptation of Patricia Highsmith's sardonic novel, a study of American dreams of Europe unraveling as lurid personality takes hold. 

3/22: Volver (Almodóvar 2006), a sensitive and heartfelt take on the story of the Odyssey's Penelope, and so a meditation on the many things it can mean to come home. 

3/29: Eve's Bayou (Lemmons 1997), a sultry, gimlet-eyed drama of desire in conflict with obligation to family--and the subterranean practices of magic that make life bearable. 

4/5: 

Moonlight (Jenkins 2016), a humane and yet impossibly knowing depiction of growing up different and discovering community, with art design and performances of astonishing certainty. 

4/12: Chi-Raq (Lee 2015), a blistering transportation of Aristophanes' Lysistrata to the south side of Chicago, where pervasive gang violence and killing is met by the ultimatum of sexual abstinence. 

4/26:  Lars and the Real Girl (Gillespie 2007), a quirky, loving ode to the human capacity to love quirk, and on that basis to forget about fearing difference--with a special place for the myth of Pygmalion.

5/3: Roman Holiday (Wyler 1953), a seminal depiction of American love of Europe--at least as it appears on screen, with the sly suggestion that, like Hepburn's princess, we must all break out of our shells.