The Mellon Initiative is compiling a list of events sponsored by humanities departments at Trinity. The list is to serve two purposes: share news of upcoming events and highlight the many ways that the humanities have been promoted recently. 

Have a Trinity humanities event to include? Please contact Betty Curry, bcurry@trinity.edu.

 

Upcoming Events: Click Here

 

Past Events:

Spring 2017 Classical Receptions - Film Screenings

Thursdays 7pm RCC 320

Questions? Prof. Benjamin Stevens (bstevens@trinity.edu).

Underworlds & Afterlives

1/21: Winter’s Bone (Granik 2010)

1/28: The Book of Life (Gutierrez 2014)

2/4: A History of Violence (Cronenberg 2005)

2/11: Orpheus (Cocteau 1950)

2/18: The Seventh Seal (Bergman 1957)

2/25: Se7en (Fincher 1995)

3/3: The Piano (Campion 1993)

3/10: Pan’s Labyrinth (del Toro 2006)

3/24: Apocalypse Now (Coppola 1979)

3/31: Night of the Living Dead (Romero 1968)

4/7: Atonement (Wright 2007)

4/14: Alien (Scott 1979) & Aliens (Cameron 1986)

4/21: Gravity (Cuarón 2013)

4/28: The Silence of the Lambs (Demme 1991)

 

Department of English

Author Susan Orlean: A Reading with Commentary

Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017, 8:00 PM, Ruth Taylor Hall

Bio: Susan Orlean is the author of seven books, including Rin Tin Tin, Saturday Night and The Orchid Thief, which was later made into the Academy Award-winning film, Adaptation, starring Nicholas Cage and Meryl Streep. Since 1992, Orlean has been a staff writer for The New Yorker and has published essays and stories in such magazines as Rolling StoneEsquireVogueOutside and Spy. A former Neiman fellow at Harvard University, Orlean has received a Guggenheim fellowship and an honorary doctorate from the University of Michigan. 

 

Southwest Texas Archaeological Society Lectures

Bettina Arnold (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee): 

"Belted Ladies and Dagger Men: Technology Brings European Iron Age Back to Life"

Thu, February 23, 2017, 7:30pm – 8:30pm, Chapman Auditorium

 

Richard Buckley (University of Leicester):

“Richard III, The King Under the Car Park: the story of the search for the burial place of England's last Plantagenet king”

Tue, March 28, 2017, 7:30pm – 8:30pm, Chapman Auditorium

 

Southwest Texas Archaeological Society Lecture Series

October 18, 2016 - Simon James, from the School of Archaeology and Ancient History at University of Leicester, presents Blood in the Dust, Death in the Dark: combat and chemical warfare at Roman Dura-Europos, Syria. Alternatively titled 'Cold-Case CSI: Roman Syria AD256', this is a detective story, an exercise in uncovering forgotten secrets of a ferocious battle fought between the Romans and Sasanians. It is a tale told entirely through archaeology, for the siege in which perished the city of Dura-Europos, 'Pompeii of the East', is unknown to history. The Franco-American excavations of the 1920s-30s, and new work between 1986-2011, has revealed in graphic detail the course of the Sasanian attacks, and the determined efforts of the Roman defenders to thwart them; siege ramps and mines are still there to be seen, and excavation recovered copious weaponry and the bones of the slain, including dramatic traces of the defenders' last stand. This, the most vivid archaeological testimony ever found for ancient warfare, is still revealing surprises. Careful reappraisal of evidence, preserved in the old excavation archives, suggests that an early form of chemical warfare was among the horrors unleashed at Dura, the earliest archaeological testimony for one of the grimmest facets of human conflict. Simon James is Professor with the School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester, and holds his degrees from the University of London. His areas of specialization include ancient identity, ethnicity and conflict, the archaeology of violence, and Roman, Iron Age European and Partho-Sassanian material culture.

 

Fall 2016 Classical Receptions - Film Series

Department of Classical Studies - Dreams of Power & Truth

10/20: Oedipus Rex (Taymor 1992), Dido & Aeneas (Sweete 2000)

10/27: Le Scaphandre et Le Papillon (Schnabel 2007)

11/3: L.A. Confidential (Hanson 1997)

11/10: Fellini Satyricon (Fellini 1969)

11/17: Interstellar (Nolan 2014)

12/1: La Belle et La Bête (Cocteau 1946)

12/8: Gladiator (Scott 2000)

Questions? Prof. Benjamin Stevens (bstevens@trinity.edu).

 

Lennox Series Lecture

October 20, 2016 

Dr. Tricia Jenkins is an associate professor at Texas Christian University. She is the author of The CIA in Hollywood: How the Agency Shapes Film and Television, published by the University of Texas Press in 2012, with a revised and updated edition released in 2016. Her book has been translated into Farsi, Turkish, and Chinese, and her work has been featured by NPR, FOX, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, The Los Angeles Review of Books, La Vanguardia, PRI: The World, The Christian Science Monitor, and more. Her lecture is titled “Get Smart: Understanding How the CIA Works with Hollywood.” Jenkins will discuss the trend toward positive representations of the Central Intelligence Agency in American popular culture. Jenkins argues that the CIA forged connections with the entertainment industry in the 1990s, actively influencing the ways that its image is portrayed.

 

The Collaborative - Past Luncheons and Speakers

The Collaborative for Learning and Teaching sponsors an ongoing series of noon-time presentations and discussions to highlight learning and teaching at Trinity. These faculty-led, peer-to-peer exchanges provide an informal setting to discuss work-in-progress, solicit feedback, highlight pedagogical strategies, review research on learning and teaching, and more. 

 November 2, 2016

Andrew Kraebel, "Archival Sources and Undergraduate Humanities Research: Lessons from Chaucer"

Each of the roughly eighty surviving manuscripts of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales offers a unique witness to the medieval text’s history and reception.  While most undergraduate Chaucer courses simply present students with Chaucer’s text in a modern edition and thereby avoid this conceptual complexity, students in Assistant Professor of English Andrew Kraebel’s Engl. 4401 seminar engage with this manuscript record to produce substantial new research.  In the luncheon, Kraebel will introduce the multi-tiered research project undertaken by his students in this course, including the completion of a large collaborative online database, more traditional essay assignments related to the digital project, and (importantly) how all of this can also be made to serve the faculty member’s own research needs.  From the Trinity Department of English

November 29, 2016

Ruben Dupertuis, "Teaching Digital Annotation"

Course management systems and digital documents have replaced the course pack as ways of getting course materials to our students. While students now have ready access to these course materials, they don't often annotate digital documents or bring them into class session, which has particularly negative consequences for courses in disciplines where close reading and attention to the details of a text is central. In this session, Associate Professor of Religion Ruben Dupertuis will suggest that if we deliver course materials to students digitally, we also need to consider providing some instruction on how to annotate digital texts. From the Trinity Department of Religion

 October 5, 2016 

Simran Jeet Singh, "Bringing Life to Your Students: Integrating Current Events in the Classroom"

All of us teach courses that have political significance in our modern world, and we know that helping our students recognize these connections serves to deepen their learning and appreciation for the subject matter. At the same time, it’s not easy to help make these ideas come alive for students in a way that comports with their own lives and experiences. In this session, Assistant Professor of Religion Simran Jeet Singh will lead a discussion about how we can integrate current events into our own teaching in ways that are meaningful, effective, and manageable.

February, 2016
"Applying the Science of Learning: Effective Use of Technology Inside and Outside of the Classroom" Dr. Caleb McDaniel, Associate Professor of History, Rice University

March, 2016
"Simple Tools for Teaching Reader-Oriented Writing" Dr. Kyle Dickson, Director AT&T Learning Studio and Professor of English, Abilene Christian University

January, 2016  

President Danny Anderson - "Lessons Learned: Literature, Culture, and Spanish"

This session will give insight into President Danny Anderson's teaching experiences and strategies. He will share key lessons he learned as he taught literature and culture classes to groups that included second-language learners as well as native speakers. One of the key areas of focus for him has been the development of strategies to increase student interest in reading literary works. He has used the design of service learning courses, culture classes, and even business Spanish classes to create new motivations for literary reading among students who initially expressed little interest in literature.

October, 2015

Corinne Pache - "Editing Ancient Manuscripts: The Homer Multitext Comes to Trinity"

In the spring of 2015, with the help of a Mellon Course-Embedded Research grant, Associate Professor of Classical Studies Corinne Pache overhauled her advanced ancient Greek course on Homer’s Iliad. Besides focusing on translating and interpreting the text, as is traditional, students also collaborated on an interdisciplinary and multi-institutional editing project, the Homer Multitext. Using high-definition images, Pache and her students worked as a team to produce an electronic edition of a 13th-century manuscript of the Iliad, and students worked on individual research projects that required them to learn how to read scholarly commentaries and paraphrases. These assignments gave students a model for collaborative research and working in the digital humanities in general. In this luncheon, participants will have an opportunity to discuss ways of incorporating research with digital primary sources in an undergraduate course.

 

Decoursey Lecture

October 10, 2016 - Nikki Giovanni 

The Trinity University DeCoursey Lecture presents award-winning poet Nikki Giovanni. One of the world's most well-known African American poets, Nikki Giovanni's work has been influenced by the Civil Rights Movement as well as the Black Power Movement and covers topics of race, social issues, and even children's literature. She has been awarded the Langston Hughes Medal, the NAACP Image Award, twenty honorary doctorates, and has been nominated for a Grammy Award. Oprah Winfrey named her one of twenty-five "Living Legends." In 2015, she was named a Virginia Women in History for her contributions to poetry, education, and society. The event is free and open to the public. The DeCoursey Lecture Series is made possible by a gift from the late General Elbert DeCoursey and Mrs. Esther DeCoursey of San Antonio.

 

Lecture

October 10, 2016 - La Literatura De Jose Emilio Pacheco

Dr. Vicente Quirarte, member of El Colegio Nacional and professor at UNAM, Mexico City, will be giving a lecture on the literature and poetry of the Mexican writer José Emilio Pacheco. The lecture will be in Spanish, and it promises to be a wonderful opportunity to know more about an author that carefully depicted the modernization of Mexico in narrative and poetry.

 

Events sponsored/submitted by the Department of English:

 2015-2016 Poets David Tomas Martinez, Suzanne Hollister, Tyrone Boucher

 

Medieval & Early Symposiums

November 2015 - Bradley Warren, Nandra Perry, Amy Dunaggin

 

Ruth McLean Bowman Bowers Visiting Artist - Women's History Month         

September, 2015 - Eve Ensler, Sarah Hepola, Mary Miss

 

Shakespeare Symposium        

September, 2016 - Alan Farmer & Sarah Neville, Zachary Lesser, Claire Bourne, Tara Lyons

 

Stieren Lectures Series 

October, 2015 - Anne Waldman

 

Trinity Review     

2015-2016 -Scary Story, Open Mic, Holiday event, Love Poem Contest

 

The fall meeting of the Texas chapter of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers

October, 2016, hosted by Claudia Stokes. Gathered literature scholars from all around the state.

 

Fall 2016 Classical Receptions - Film Series

Dreams of Power & Truth

8/25: Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (Lucas 1977)

9/1: The Hurt Locker (Bigelow 2008)

9/8: Unforgiven (Eastwood 1992)

9/15: Chinatown (Polanski 1974)

9/22: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Yates 2010/11)

9/29: Never Let Me Go (Romanek 2010)

10/6: The Wicker Man (Hardy 1973)

10/20: Oedipus Rex (Taymor 1992), Dido & Aeneas (Sweete 2000)

10/27: Le Scaphandre et Le Papillon (Schnabel 2007)

11/3: L.A. Confidential (Hanson 1997)

11/10: Fellini Satyricon (Fellini 1969)

11/17: Interstellar (Nolan 2014)

12/1: La Belle et La Bête (Cocteau 1946)

12/8: Gladiator (Scott 2000)

Questions? Prof. Benjamin Stevens (bstevens@trinity.edu).

 

HUMA (FYE 1600 Great Books of the Ancient World) Lectures and Guest Speakers – Fall 2016

Erwin Cook (Greek History and Literature)

Corinne Pache (Homer’s Iliad)

Erwin Cook (Iliad)

Peter Meineck (Aeschylus’ Oresteia—Agamemnon) [NYU]

Mark Garrison (Aeschylus’ OresteiaLibation Bearers and Furies)

Kyle Gillette (Euripides’ Bacchae)

Hans Wietzke (Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War)

Damian Calouri (Plato’s Symposium)

Judith Norman (Aristotle’s Poetics)

Joe Farrell (Virgil’s Aeneid (Books 1-6)) [UPenn]

Ben Stevens (Aeneid (Books 7-12))

David Elmer (Apuleius’ Golden Ass) [Harvard]

Ruben Dupertuis (Augustine’s Confessions)

 

Classical Myth Film Series – Fall 2015

Pan's Labyrinth

True Grit (2010)

O, Brother Where Art Thou?

2001: A Space Odyssey

Forbidden Planet

Spartacus

Black Orpheus

Blade Runner

Hercules

The Fellowship of the Ring

 

Classical Receptions Film Series – Spring 2016

Winter’s Bone

The Book of Life

A History of Violence

Orpheus

The Seventh Seal

Se7en

The Piano

Pan’s Labyrinth

Apocalypse Now

Night of the Living Dead

Atonement

Alien and Aliens

Gravity

The Silence of the Lambs

November 2015 - Medea at the Classic Theatre  

 

Southwest Texas Archaeological Society Lecture Series 

October 18, 2016 - Simon James, from the School of Archaeology and Ancient History at University of Leicester, presents Blood in the Dust, Death in the Dark: combat and chemical warfare at Roman Dura-Europos, Syria.

Alternatively titled 'Cold-Case CSI: Roman Syria AD256', this is a detective story, an exercise in uncovering forgotten secrets of a ferocious battle fought between the Romans and Sasanians. It is a tale told entirely through archaeology, for the siege in which perished the city of Dura-Europos, 'Pompeii of the East', is unknown to history. The Franco-American excavations of the 1920s-30s, and new work between 1986-2011, has revealed in graphic detail the course of the Sasanian attacks, and the determined efforts of the Roman defenders to thwart them; siege ramps and mines are still there to be seen, and excavation recovered copious weaponry and the bones of the slain, including dramatic traces of the defenders' last stand. This, the most vivid archaeological testimony ever found for ancient warfare, is still revealing surprises. Careful reappraisal of evidence, preserved in the old excavation archives, suggests that an early form of chemical warfare was among the horrors unleashed at Dura, the earliest archaeological testimony for one of the grimmest facets of human conflict. Simon James is Professor with the School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester, and holds his degrees from the University of London. His areas of specialization include ancient identity, ethnicity and conflict, the archaeology of violence, and Roman, Iron Age European and Partho-Sassanian material culture.

 

 November 7, 2016 - Nathan T. Elkins (Baylor University): “The Roman Colosseum”

 

SWTAS (Southwest Texas Archaeological Society) 2015-16

Covering a wide variety of topics within the field of archaeology, the Southwest Texas Archaeological Society (SWTAS) Lecture Series is free and open to the public. The series is made possible by the Archaeological Institute of America, SWTAS, and the Department of Classical Studies at Trinity University and occasional collaboration with UTSA and San Antonio College.

Thomas Howe, Professor of Art History at Southwestern University, on "The Gardens of Flora: New Discoveries at the Roman Seaside Villas of Stabiae near Pompeii" https://www.archaeological.org/lectures/abstracts/5813

Rita Lucarelli, Professor of Egyptology at University of California - Berkeley, on “Demonology and Magic in Ancient Egypt” 

Adam Rabinowitz, Associate Professor in the Department of Classics at The University of Texas at Austin, on “Between the Steppe and the Sea: Greeks, Taurians, and Sythians in Crimea”

Hanan Charaf Mullins, University of Paris I-Sorbonne, titled " The Year of Digging Dangerously: The discovery of a Late Roman-Early Byzantine chamber tomb/Hypogeum in Lebanon" https://www.archaeological.org/lectures/abstracts/19266

 

Humanities-related events in the library’s Special Collections & Archives for the academic year 2015/2016:

January, 2016 - Trinity Treasures Tour

   Sponsored by Alumni Relations, a morning tour and an afternoon tour give alums the opportunity to visit Special Collections and Archives and view items going back as far as the 1400's, along with historical archival items from the university's history.

February, 2016 - Memorable Days

  Trinity alumna and Villanova history professor Judy Giesberg drew back the current on the daily private life of Emilie Davis, an African-American living in Philadelphia during the Civil War. “The Memorable Days” website is the product of Dr Giesberg’s digital history project, which turned the contents of three years of personal diaries into a publicly accessible website. 

April, 2016 - Renaissance & Medieval Studies Student Colloquium    

  Six students presented their papers to an audience of fifty student, faculty, and guests. 

April, 2016 - Collegium Musicum in Concert 

   Six students in the newly revived MUSE 1196 capped their semester’s work with a live performance in special collections.

July 2015 - Classical Studies in Special Collections  

  The 2015 National Junior Classical League Convention was held at Trinity University. The exhibit highlighted materials in special collections that would be of interest to those attending the convention.

Fall 2015-Spring 2016 - Discovering Special Collections - Environmental Studies

  An exhibit focusing on materials in Special Collections & Archives that have a connection to environmental studies. They included, among others, the Fay Sinkin Collection, which details early efforts to stop development over the Edward Aquifer Recharge Zone in San Antonio.

Spring 2016 - Trinity University Memories

  An exhibit created on the occasion of the Trinity Treasure Tours in January 2016. It featured items from the historical archive that reflect student life at Trinity over many decades.

April 2016 - Children's Literature Illustrators in Special Collections  

  In conjunction with a display of new children's literature exhibited on the main floor of the library, special collections will exhibit various editions of books illustrated by Arthur Rackham and Kate Greenaway.

 

Religion Department, Lennox Lectures, Spring 2016: